Family Caregivers Finally Get A Break — And Some Coaching

 Lorena Bradford (left), head of accessible programs at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., leads a session of the museum's  Just Us  program. The program gives adults with memory loss and their caregivers a chance to explore and discuss works of art in a small-group setting (Lynne Shallcross/KHN).

Lorena Bradford (left), head of accessible programs at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., leads a session of the museum's Just Us program. The program gives adults with memory loss and their caregivers a chance to explore and discuss works of art in a small-group setting (Lynne Shallcross/KHN).

Across the country, community groups, hospitals, government agencies and nonprofits are starting to do more to support at least some of the estimated 42 million friends and family members who are the primary caregivers of adults and children who have disabilities, are recovering from surgeries and illnesses or are coping with Alzheimer's and other chronic diseases.

Read more story about what efforts are being made to help the helpers in NPR.