Teens Triumph Over Aging

 Members of the winning Mid-Atlantic Region team provide a city tour to two of the competition's judges, including Kamili Wilson, AARP Vice President of Enterprise Initiatives. (PHOTO COURTESY DISCOVERE)

Members of the winning Mid-Atlantic Region team provide a city tour to two of the competition's judges, including Kamili Wilson, AARP Vice President of Enterprise Initiatives. (PHOTO COURTESY DISCOVERE)

How can we ensure that the cities of the future will meet the needs of people across rapidly expanding lifespans?

One way is to start educating students about aging-related issues from a young age so the planners, engineers, architects and policy makers of the future will understand the need for communities to be livable for all ages. The next step is to ensure that students move into adulthood with the skill sets they'll require in order to succeed. 

To that aim, the 2018 Future City Competition, sponsored by AARP, hosted an annual educational event that chose "age-friendly cities" as its theme for the 2017-2018 school year. More than 40,000 6th-, 7th- and 8th-graders from across the U.S. — as well as numerous nations participated in the program to identify an age-related challenge in today's urban environment and then engineer two innovative solutions that will allow the older adults in their "future city" to enjoy active and independent lives.

Learn more about the innovative solutions suggested by the students and their achievements in the AARP.org.