The Age-Friendly City Can't Just Be for the Wealthy

 Samuel Cole, 85, of Los Angeles, poses in his motorhome. Cole moved into the vehicle when he wasn't able to afford a $100 rise in his rent. (Lucy Nicholson/Reuters)

Samuel Cole, 85, of Los Angeles, poses in his motorhome. Cole moved into the vehicle when he wasn't able to afford a $100 rise in his rent. (Lucy Nicholson/Reuters)

Today, more than 200 virtual villages have been established in towns and cities across the U.S. with ardent desire to "age in place." But the village movement and attempts to build age-friendly communities have largely benefited high-income households, said Phillipson—leaving out the very communities most in need of infrastructural improvements. “And inequalities often grow worse as we age,” he said. “It’s hard to be an older person if you’ve had a lifelong experience of poverty.” He argues, “the movement needs to address how it can be more socially inclusive.”

Read more about the research on Age-friendly Cities and Communities and How communities can work to address the inequities.