Buffalo News Editorial: Extend Metro Rail

 A rendering of plans for the Metro Rail station at the University at Buffalo’s North Campus in Amherst, part of the proposal to add 6.5 miles to the line, for a total of just under 13 miles. The project should proceed (Buffalo News)

A rendering of plans for the Metro Rail station at the University at Buffalo’s North Campus in Amherst, part of the proposal to add 6.5 miles to the line, for a total of just under 13 miles. The project should proceed (Buffalo News)

Most of us can agree that the 6.4-mile Metro Rail from the heart of a resurgent downtown to the University at Buffalo’s South campus is an underutilized asset; it is aging and deteriorating. 

But all of that can change – will change, if proponents of Metro Rail extension have their way. For that to happen, everyone must be on board. The entire community and, more important, the elected officials whose job it is to procure money to invest in their community. Read the full story at Buffalo News.  

The push is on to legalize Class 1 E-Bikes in NYS

 The electric drive system on ebikes can only be activated through a pedaling action and is limited to relatively low speeds. (photo courtesy of Buffalo Rising)

The electric drive system on ebikes can only be activated through a pedaling action and is limited to relatively low speeds. (photo courtesy of Buffalo Rising)

Buffalo may be adopting yet another form of ride sharing transportation following it's most recent additions of Uber and Lyft last year. Currently, State and local organizations are joining NYS residents to encourage lawmakers in Albany to legalize the Class 1 e-bikes for use on public streets. Class 1 e-bikes do not have a throttle mechanism, and the electronic "pedal-assist" system can only be activated through a pedaling action and is limited to relatively low speeds.

 “Pedal-assist bikes are one of the most exciting and fun ways to solve today’s transit problems and it would be a shame if Buffalo, and other cities across the state, could not take advantage of it,” said Michael Galligano, CEO of Shared Mobility Inc, Co-Founder of Reddy Bikeshare.

The legalization of this transportation system may provide a greener, healthier alternative for many people in Buffalo and NYS. 

Read more at Buffalo Rising.   

State funding grant advances low-income senior housing on East Side

 A rendering of the new Buffalo Federation of Neighborhood Centers’ planned low-income senior housing, from Adams Street. (Photo Courtesy of Buffalo News)

A rendering of the new Buffalo Federation of Neighborhood Centers’ planned low-income senior housing, from Adams Street. (Photo Courtesy of Buffalo News)

Construction of a new low-income senior housing community with 84 apartments is set to begin by September in Buffalo’s East Side. This new development will feature an “aging-in-place” model and will offer facilities such as a certified senior "social adult day care" program, a Metcare Rx pharmacy, a primary care satellite office and some office space, with residents having access to the services through an interior link between the buildings.

More information available at Buffalo News

Teens Triumph Over Aging

 Members of the winning Mid-Atlantic Region team provide a city tour to two of the competition's judges, including Kamili Wilson, AARP Vice President of Enterprise Initiatives. (PHOTO COURTESY DISCOVERE)

Members of the winning Mid-Atlantic Region team provide a city tour to two of the competition's judges, including Kamili Wilson, AARP Vice President of Enterprise Initiatives. (PHOTO COURTESY DISCOVERE)

How can we ensure that the cities of the future will meet the needs of people across rapidly expanding lifespans?

One way is to start educating students about aging-related issues from a young age so the planners, engineers, architects and policy makers of the future will understand the need for communities to be livable for all ages. The next step is to ensure that students move into adulthood with the skill sets they'll require in order to succeed. 

To that aim, the 2018 Future City Competition, sponsored by AARP, hosted an annual educational event that chose "age-friendly cities" as its theme for the 2017-2018 school year. More than 40,000 6th-, 7th- and 8th-graders from across the U.S. — as well as numerous nations participated in the program to identify an age-related challenge in today's urban environment and then engineer two innovative solutions that will allow the older adults in their "future city" to enjoy active and independent lives.

Learn more about the innovative solutions suggested by the students and their achievements in the AARP.org.

How Discrimination Damages Health In LGBTQ Communities

   (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health /  YouTube)

(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health /YouTube)

More than half of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer Americans report they have experienced violence, threats or harassment because of their sexuality or gender identity, according to a recent poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. And nearly 1 in 5 LGBTQ adults has avoided seeking medical care for fear of discrimination.

Discrimination not only keeps some people away from needed health care, studies show it can create lifelong stress, leading to chronic health problems like heart disease and depression.

Listen to the forum at the Harvard Chan School in NPR and learn more about the impact of these experiences on physical and mental well-being and what can be done to help.