Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus to help guide Smart Corridor for Main Street

(Buffalo Rising)

(Buffalo Rising)

More inventive thinking and planning is being developed to integrate smart transportation infrastructure and technology to create an innovative, greener, safer, and more accessible street along the Main Street corridor, from Goodell Street to Ferry Street.

Learn more about the project in the Buffalo Rising.

This New York Gallery Has An Unusual Age Limit: No Artists Younger Than 60

The Carter Burden Gallery in Chelsea only shows works by artists who are at least 60 years old. (Carter Burden Gallery)

The Carter Burden Gallery in Chelsea only shows works by artists who are at least 60 years old. (Carter Burden Gallery)

Some artists in New York may be wishing to get older faster. The Carter Burden Gallery in New York caters to artists age 60 and older. No kids allowed.

"Older adults do not stop being who they are because they hit a particular age... I think it's giving an opportunity to a group of people that have had the opportunity removed simply because of their age. Opportunities are few and far between at any gallery for any artist of any age, so I think we're trying to just right a wrong, rather than get in the way of anyone else having an opportunity." said gallery director Marlena Vaccaro. 

Learn more about how this gallery is impacting the aging society in the WBFO.

Health Foundation awards $50,000 grant to establish healthy aging framework

The Health Foundation for Western and Central New York has awarded a $50,000 grant to the New York State Department of Health to establish a healthy aging framework within Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Health Across All Policies Initiative and prepare the state’s Prevention Agenda for 2019-2024.

Learn more about how the Health Foundation engages in creating a Healthy Aging Roadmap and making the Health Across All Policies initiative a success in New York.

Don’t miss out on some gardening green!

(Buffalo Rising)

(Buffalo Rising)

Garden Walk Buffalo is more than just America’s largest garden tour – it’s also got its eye on beautifying Buffalo by providing grants to block clubs and community groups toward projects like community gardens, street side planters, historical garden restoration, street pole banners, annuals for baskets and pretty much any garden-related project.

Garden Walk Buffalo Marvin Lunenfeld Beautification Grant Applications now available online but the applications are due Wednesday, February 28, 2018. 

Read more about the past recipients of the grants and new grant application in the Buffalo Rising.

Dormant DL&W Rail Line will become a Greenway and Linear Park

(Buffalo Rising/ Jajean Rose-Burney)

(Buffalo Rising/ Jajean Rose-Burney)

The Western New York Land Conservancy (WNYLC) has announced that a vision of connecting land along the Buffalo River, to create a greenway that would essentially utilize fallow land along the former DL&W rail line, is going to become a reality.

Converting a abandoned rail corridor into public space is expected to become a great resource for both visitors to the waterfront and residents. “Not only will it be a place to relax and enjoy the beautiful green paths, it will be a way to create a more walkable, bikeable community and connect neighborhoods together,” noted Sara Heidinger, President of The Old First Ward Community Center.

Read more about the movement that will benefit livability and walkability of the Buffalo Waterfront in the Buffalo Rising

Neuroscientist Predicts 'Much Better Treatment' For Alzheimer's Is 10 Years Away

Neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli says that while a certain amount of memory loss is a natural part of aging, what Alzheimer patients experience is different. (Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images)

Neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli says that while a certain amount of memory loss is a natural part of aging, what Alzheimer patients experience is different. (Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images)

"Losing your keys, forgetting where you put your glasses, is completely normal," Joseph Jebelli says. "But when you find your glasses and your keys and you think, 'What are these for?' — that's a sign that there's something else going on, that it's not just a memory loss."

Though there is no cure for Alzheimer's disease, Jebelli is optimistic about current research involving neural stem cells and cell regeneration. Learn more about how the brain changes with age and some treatments Jebelli suggests in WBFO.