Teens Triumph Over Aging

 Members of the winning Mid-Atlantic Region team provide a city tour to two of the competition's judges, including Kamili Wilson, AARP Vice President of Enterprise Initiatives. (PHOTO COURTESY DISCOVERE)

Members of the winning Mid-Atlantic Region team provide a city tour to two of the competition's judges, including Kamili Wilson, AARP Vice President of Enterprise Initiatives. (PHOTO COURTESY DISCOVERE)

How can we ensure that the cities of the future will meet the needs of people across rapidly expanding lifespans?

One way is to start educating students about aging-related issues from a young age so the planners, engineers, architects and policy makers of the future will understand the need for communities to be livable for all ages. The next step is to ensure that students move into adulthood with the skill sets they'll require in order to succeed. 

To that aim, the 2018 Future City Competition, sponsored by AARP, hosted an annual educational event that chose "age-friendly cities" as its theme for the 2017-2018 school year. More than 40,000 6th-, 7th- and 8th-graders from across the U.S. — as well as numerous nations participated in the program to identify an age-related challenge in today's urban environment and then engineer two innovative solutions that will allow the older adults in their "future city" to enjoy active and independent lives.

Learn more about the innovative solutions suggested by the students and their achievements in the AARP.org.

How Discrimination Damages Health In LGBTQ Communities

   (Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health /  YouTube)

(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health /YouTube)

More than half of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer Americans report they have experienced violence, threats or harassment because of their sexuality or gender identity, according to a recent poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. And nearly 1 in 5 LGBTQ adults has avoided seeking medical care for fear of discrimination.

Discrimination not only keeps some people away from needed health care, studies show it can create lifelong stress, leading to chronic health problems like heart disease and depression.

Listen to the forum at the Harvard Chan School in NPR and learn more about the impact of these experiences on physical and mental well-being and what can be done to help.

Bad food + smoking - exercise = Shorter lives for Western New Yorkers

 Erie County gets higher-than-average marks for making clinical health care and exercise options available for residents, but still lags in health outcomes and well-being, according to two new reports. (Mark Mulville/The Buffalo News)

Erie County gets higher-than-average marks for making clinical health care and exercise options available for residents, but still lags in health outcomes and well-being, according to two new reports. (Mark Mulville/The Buffalo News)

Major upgrades on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus and improvements overall in regional medical care have yet to translate into improved health outcomes in Western New York, according to a Gallup-Sharecare survey released Monday.

The Buffalo Niagara metro area ranked 151 out of 186 metro regions in terms of health and well-being.

While school districts are doing wellness activities, Buffalo being one of the leaders, there are areas where things need to be improved. Read more about the story on the Buffalo News.

Rochester makes list of best ‘Complete Streets’ projects

 Rendering of the future intersection of Monroe & Howell, after filling-in the six-lane sunken 'Inner Loop' expressway. (Image credit: City of Rochester, NY)

Rendering of the future intersection of Monroe & Howell, after filling-in the six-lane sunken 'Inner Loop' expressway. (Image credit: City of Rochester, NY)

With a federal TIGER grant and broad support from the community, Rochester is converting an outdated urban expressway into a walkable, bikeable Complete Streets boulevard. 

“Through the Inner Loop East Transformation Project, the City of Rochester, NY is reimagining its street network by putting people and place before cars,” reports Heather Zaccaro. 

Read more about the story on the Partners for a Livable Western New York

Amherst Center for Senior Services upgrades facility with way-finding features

 An orange sign in the Amherst Center for Senior Services hangs in front of a corridor to indicate which rooms and services are ahead. (The Amherst Bee)

An orange sign in the Amherst Center for Senior Services hangs in front of a corridor to indicate which rooms and services are ahead. (The Amherst Bee)

In collaboration with the Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access at the University at Buffalo, the Amherst Center for Senior Services has installed new signs and a color-coding system to help its members navigate the 53,000-square-foot facility.

“Good way-finding systems are important in general, but particularly important in places like senior centers because they will reduce the cognitive and physical efforts of visitors,” said Heamchand Subryan, design research associate at the IDeA Center.

Read more about the story on the Amherst Bee.